John Doe

John Doe

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This article is part of a series which discusses the lessons we have learned while developing our startup. We hope that passing this knowledge onto you will accelerate your decision-making process and provide insights into how other startups are tackling problems.

In the startup world, there are endless ideas. Ideas are a dime a dozen. They matter very little when compared to the effort required to execute an idea. The execution aspect is often lost in the mix. This article focuses on a way to execute through an effective process. This process is agile.

The best process for a startup is one which allows for quick decisions, streamlined workflow, and consensus on how things should be done. As the business scales, it would also be convenient to have a process that can easily be reproduced for each new team. This allows for consistent execution with predictable results. A which point, translating goals into results simply becomes a logistical issue. Planning when to tackle different problems, lay out feature timelines, and expanding the team.

First, a quick story.

A few weeks ago, I got a message from a stranger on LinkedIn.

“Hi, I work for *****. Can we set up a call to discuss how I can help you meet your annual marketing goals?”

No.”

“Don’t you have annual marketing goals you want to accomplish?”

No, we hardly have monthly marketing goals. We don’t think in terms of months or years, we think in terms of minutes and hours.

We don’t have time to make decisions on a year scale. It would be a massive waste of time and impossible to predict. Large corporations tend to misunderstand this notion. They are disconnected from the rapid pace that is required to remain competitive as a startup. The timescale of execution and planning is an order of magnitude smaller for us. Planning a year of marketing and development, then executing it to the letter is not an accomplishment, that’s a failed startup. The team needs to be constantly taking feedback, iterating on their ideas, and making better decisions based on new information.

Don’t run a startup like a corporation. It’s a startup. The only advantage you have is the ability to move fast and deliberately make decisions that quickly adjust your position.

How Agile Helps

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This article is part of a series which discusses the lessons we have learned while developing our startup. We hope that passing this knowledge onto

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